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  • (@axepalace) Instagram Profile @axepalace
  • Oh my. Dingwall NG2 in Mopar Purple!
    ๐Ÿ“ธ: @samzelden
  • Oh my.  Dingwall NG2 in Mopar Purple!
๐Ÿ“ธ: @samzelden
  •  12  2 2 minutes ago

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  • (@shreddeadofficial) Instagram Profile @shreddeadofficial
  • I really like this video! Be sure to check out @jhemy88 If you do too!
    ๐ŸŽธ: @jhemy88
    ใƒปใƒปใƒป
    Normally Iโ€™ll improvise over a backing track, but I took some time and wrote this one. I think I like what it came out to be. What do you think?
  • I really like this video! Be sure to check out @jhemy88 If you do too!
๐ŸŽธ: @jhemy88
ใƒปใƒปใƒป
Normally Iโ€™ll improvise over a backing track, but I took some time and wrote this one. I think I like what it came out to be. What do you think?
  •  26  1 5 minutes ago

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  • (@instaguitarist_) Instagram Profile @instaguitarist_
  • ๐ŸŽธ๐Ÿ’ฅComment & tag a friend๐Ÿ‘
    ๐Ÿ‘ˆFollow Us for more ๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ’•
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    New Gear Thursday where I play around with the โ€œChord Buddyโ€ - Beginner Learning tool
    /
    ๐ŸŽธBy martyschwartz
    Follow us @instaguitarist_
  • ๐ŸŽธ๐Ÿ’ฅComment & tag a friend๐Ÿ‘
๐Ÿ‘ˆFollow Us for more ๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ’•
/
New Gear Thursday where I play around with the โ€œChord Buddyโ€ - Beginner Learning tool
/
๐ŸŽธBy martyschwartz
Follow us @instaguitarist_
  •  1  1 10 minutes ago

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  • (@studiopromusicaguitar) Instagram Profile @studiopromusicaguitar
  • Playing music with other musicians is not only a lot of fun, itโ€™s also enormously beneficial to oneโ€™s development. Ensemble play can sharpen your timing, enhance your improvisational abilities, further develop your rhythmic skills, and even help develop your musical โ€œear.โ€ But itโ€™s not always easy. Playing with others requires you to play steadily and consistently, as even a minor rhythmic fluctuation can cause you to fall out of time with the other musicians. And of course, playing with others can be intimidating at first. Here are few tips for playing well with others. They may seem obvious, but consistent application of them will really help your ensemble abilities. First, listen. Try to find that balance between paying attention to your own parts and hearing (and enjoying!) the overall sound. Be patient with yourself and commit, at first, to counting. At first, you may need to count each measure, and even each beat, carefully. Thatโ€™s fine; in time, youโ€™ll develop a โ€œsenseโ€ of how many measures youโ€™ve played, and where in the song you should be. In order to get this sense, try "listening" to the piece you are playing in your head as you play; you should always be listening one or two measures ahead. This will help you stay focused even when it seems like your ensemble is falling apart. Itโ€™s also a good idea to work with a metronome (to build not only chops, but also rhythmic proficiency). But as valuable as a metronome is -- and it is -- I recommend you also play along to a drum machine, or to an app like โ€œMetroDrumโ€ (available for Android but unfortunately not for iPhone). In other words, play along to a timekeeper that sounds like actual percussion. This will give you the demands of a metronome, but help you โ€œlock inโ€ to a rhythmic groove. Itโ€™s also a lot more fun than a regular metronome. As one of my students put it, โ€œI can relate to the drums better than the metronome.โ€ If you stick with this approach โ€“ commit to counting, play to a timekeeper, and work on your listening skills โ€“ youโ€™ll be holding your own in a group setting much more quickly than if you just โ€œwing it.โ€ Good luck!!
  • Playing music with other musicians is not only a lot of fun, itโ€™s also enormously beneficial to oneโ€™s development.  Ensemble play can sharpen your timing, enhance your improvisational abilities, further develop your rhythmic skills, and even help develop your musical โ€œear.โ€ But itโ€™s not always easy.  Playing with others requires you to play steadily and consistently, as even a minor rhythmic fluctuation can cause you to fall out of time with the other musicians.  And of course, playing with others can be intimidating at first.  Here are few tips for playing well with others.  They may seem obvious, but consistent application of them will really help your ensemble abilities.  First, listen.  Try to find that balance between paying attention to your own parts and hearing (and enjoying!) the overall sound.  Be patient with yourself and commit, at first, to counting.  At first, you may need to count each measure, and even each beat, carefully.  Thatโ€™s fine; in time, youโ€™ll develop a โ€œsenseโ€ of how many measures youโ€™ve played, and where in the song you should be.  In order to get this sense, try "listening" to the piece you are playing in your head as you play; you should always be listening one or two measures ahead.  This will help you stay focused even when it seems like your ensemble is falling apart.  Itโ€™s also a good idea to work with a metronome (to build not only chops, but also rhythmic proficiency). But as valuable as a metronome is -- and it is -- I recommend you also play along to a drum machine, or to an app like โ€œMetroDrumโ€ (available for Android but unfortunately not for iPhone). In other words, play along to a timekeeper that sounds like actual percussion.  This will give you the demands of a metronome, but help you โ€œlock inโ€ to a rhythmic groove.  Itโ€™s also a lot more fun than a regular metronome.  As one of my students put it, โ€œI can relate to the drums better than the metronome.โ€ If you stick with this approach โ€“ commit to counting, play to a timekeeper, and work on your listening skills โ€“ youโ€™ll be holding your own in a group setting much more quickly than if you just โ€œwing it.โ€ Good luck!!
  •  10  3 30 minutes ago

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  • (@themusiczoo) Instagram Profile @themusiczoo
  • Take a trip to outer space with this 1996 @officialjacksonguitars Roswell Rhoads! Featuring an all-aluminum body, this rare axe is number 19 of 123! Get it now at The Music Zoo! (Link in bio)
    Call or email us at 844-687-4296 // [email protected]
  • Take a trip to outer space with this 1996 @officialjacksonguitars Roswell Rhoads! Featuring an all-aluminum body, this rare axe is number 19 of 123! Get it now at The Music Zoo! (Link in bio)
Call or email us at 844-687-4296 // sales@themusiczoo.com
  •  208  2 41 minutes ago